Category Archives: Sculpture

Sol Lewitt 1928-2007

DAILY MUSE | Sad news today. Connecticut’s own Sol Lewitt, modernist, minimalist and conceptual artist, died Sunday due to complications from cancer. Best known for his Wall Drawing series– those grandly scaled, vividly colorful drawings integrated into architectural spaces filling the frame of walls from edge to edge– he remained constant in his themes throughout his career; geometric and repetitive shapes, timeless childlike constructs on paper or in “structures” (as he referred to his sculptural work) that almost seemed obvious or inevitable. Their simplicity conjures up a sense of “I can do that!”. Not in that horrid, insulting way that is often applied to artists, but in the best sense… in that it offers permission and confidence to a viewer to step in and do it too. In that respect, his work always inspires creativity.

Lewitt’s work, while part of the minimalist and conceptual schools of thought which often inspire work so heavily intellectual that it can alienate viewers, never had that effect on me. His work was always humble and joyful– never pretentious.

Please enjoy some images of an enviable oeuvre from a masterful artist.

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TODAY’S MUSE: Connect With A Creative Ally

DAILY MUSE | It’s easier to be creative in community– with creative allies who will give you the permission to show up as the creative genius that you are. As allies they’ll give you the space to reinvent yourself- or the space to just show up and be great. They’ll listen to and honor your ideas. They’ll mirror them back to you. Sometimes magnifying them and expanding them. The more you surround yourself with creative allies, the more permission you will have to show up as creatively.

List all the people you know. Who among them are your creative allies? Or have the potential to be one? Connect with one today. Now, in fact. Pick up the phone. Make a lunch appointment. Or a date to go to a museum. Or to a play. Honor your current creative allies. Reach out and cultivate new ones. And also look to see who you might be a creative ally for? Reach out to that person. Be generous with them. Create and give them the space to just be great in.

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TODAY’S MUSE: Dada

DAILY MUSE | Dada came as a reaction to Work War I. As an artist what is your reaction to our current state of War?

These artists had some fun with Dada… Dada (A Pseudomentary)

TODAY’S MUSE: Organize a Creative Workspace


Artist’s Studio by Jan Vermeer

DAILY MUSE | Part of allowing creativity into your life means setting aside space for creativity to easily occur when it moves through you. Today, set aside a space in your home. A desk. A workbench. A chair or a corner. Provide yourself an adequate work surface, and adjacent to it gather all the tools, supplies, instruments or equipment needed for your creative endeavors. Have them easily accessible and organized. Have the space clear from any clutter other than what is needed for you creations. Set it up so that it is always ready to go when you are moved to create. That way you can begin creating at the time the spirit moves you, rather than expending amounts of your creative energy in clearing the space of clutter at the time you are wanting most to create.

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TODAY’S MUSE: The Discontinuity Principle


Belvedere, by M. C. Escher

DAILY MUSE | via Creativity Web | Disruption offers creative possibilities.

The more you are used to something, the less stimulating it is for our thinking.

When you disrupt your thought patterns, those ideas that create the greatest stimulus to our thinking do so because they force us to make new connections in order to comprehend the situation. Roger van Oech calls this a “Whack on the Side of the Head”, and Edward de Bono coined a new word, PO, which stands for “Provocative Operation”.

Try programming interruptions into your day. Change working hours, get to work a different way, listen to a different radio station, read some magazines or books you wouldn’t normally read, try a different recipe, watch a TV program or film you wouldn’t normally watch.

Provocative ideas are often stepping stones that get us thinking about other ideas. Abutting ideas next to each other, such that their friction creates new thought-paths a technique that flourishes in the east (haiku poetry and Zen koans) but causes discomfort in Western thinking.

Learn other creative techniques here.

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Maya Lin: A Strong Clear Vision

DAILY MUSE | Maya Lin, designer of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, has long been an inspiration to me. I’ve never seen a lengthy interview with her before, until now. Charlie Rose conducted and interview with her when the documentary about her ” Maya Lin: A Strong Clear Vision” came out. The interview with her starts at 20:43, after the Richard Harris interview.

TODAY’S MUSE: Squiggles


DAILY MUSE | TODAY’S MUSE comes from a fellow WordPress blogger, Weird Guy. He explains the childhood memory of a friend who’s mother had a unique way to keep order in the car and the kids occupied on long car trips. She… “would take pieces of paper and draw random lines and squiggles on them and then hand each child a sheet with the lines on it. She would have the kids use the existing lines to draw a picture from their imagination. Once a picture was handed back as “completed”, she would repeat the process all over again.”

I find this to be a great creative exercise. In fact, I tried it with my god daughter last night–she loved it. It really frees up one’s imagination and gets one into opening up to a communal creative process– that kind when something can be created soley by the combined creative efforts of yourself with others.

Consider that this creative technique can be applied to all forms of art as well– music composition, dance, comedy, theatre, painting, film, and more. It’s a method of improvisation.

Try it. If you do, or have, share about it here.

Read more here… (link and photos via Weird Guy)

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