Category Archives: Art History

THE SUNDAY SERVING: ‘Twin Peaks’ Pilot Episode

DAILY MUSE | I’ve been finding alot of great TV links over the course of getting my new Macbook set up. One of these links is of the pilot episode of David Lynch’s masterpiece of the surreal, ‘Twin Peaks’. This highly creative, ground breaking series, which lasted a mere two seasons on ABC, revolutionized TV production to follow. It elevated the the overall prodcution quality of TV series, blurring the boundary between cinema and television. It’s quirky style pioneered that of other series to follow including ‘Northern Exposure’, ‘The X- Files’, ‘Six Feet Under’ and ‘Desperate Housewives’. It also pioneered the use of a season long and/or series long plot arc that has come to be commonplace, as in recent series like ’24’ and ‘Lost’. Enjoy!

(Not the best quality video, but still watchable.)

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Part 5

Part 6

Part 7

Part 8

Part 9

Part 10

Part 11

Part 12

Part 13

Part 14

UPDATE | Please tell me if you are having any trouble with the links.

GENERAL UPDATE |For the time being, I wil not be posting daily as I did and I intended when I started this blog. I will try to post a weekly ‘Sunday Serving’ and on occassion a ‘Today’s Muse’ post. Once the summer passes and my life responsibilities attain a better balance I’ll look to return to daily posts.

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Sol Lewitt 1928-2007

DAILY MUSE | Sad news today. Connecticut’s own Sol Lewitt, modernist, minimalist and conceptual artist, died Sunday due to complications from cancer. Best known for his Wall Drawing series– those grandly scaled, vividly colorful drawings integrated into architectural spaces filling the frame of walls from edge to edge– he remained constant in his themes throughout his career; geometric and repetitive shapes, timeless childlike constructs on paper or in “structures” (as he referred to his sculptural work) that almost seemed obvious or inevitable. Their simplicity conjures up a sense of “I can do that!”. Not in that horrid, insulting way that is often applied to artists, but in the best sense… in that it offers permission and confidence to a viewer to step in and do it too. In that respect, his work always inspires creativity.

Lewitt’s work, while part of the minimalist and conceptual schools of thought which often inspire work so heavily intellectual that it can alienate viewers, never had that effect on me. His work was always humble and joyful– never pretentious.

Please enjoy some images of an enviable oeuvre from a masterful artist.

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THE SUNDAY SERVING: The Beatles London Rooftop Concert

DAILY MUSE | I thought long and hard about what to feature on today’s Sunday Serving– it being Easter and all. I considered featuring specific content about god, creativity and spirituality. But I do that a lot as it is. I thought that that would actually be too heavy for today. Instead, I thought we needed something different– something spontaneous in nature with a sense of rarity… and surprise, excitement and light. So I’ve decided on this– footage of The Beatles 1969 surprise rooftop appearance which turned out to be their last public performance together. Hope you enjoy it.

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

See all THE SUNDAY SERVINGS here.

TODAY’S MUSE: Childhood Food and Fare


DAILY MUSE | Connect with your inner creative child today by connecting with your own actual childhood– savor some of your favorite childhood food and fare. Some of mine were Fluffernutter sandwiches, chocolate milk and Alpha-Bits cereal. What were your favorites? What do they taste like now? How do they make you feel?

Fluffernutter image via Melissa Glick

UPDATE | These artists seem to be drawing inspiration directly from their childhood fare.

Learn about TODAY’S MUSE here.
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TODAY’S MUSE here.

TODAY’S MUSE: Dada

DAILY MUSE | Dada came as a reaction to Work War I. As an artist what is your reaction to our current state of War?

These artists had some fun with Dada… Dada (A Pseudomentary)

Hello Dali

DAILY MUSE | Here is a wonderful documentary on surrealist Salvador Dali.

(Last week, I used his image “Persistance of Memory” in this post.)